Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women held in Philadelphia, May 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th, 1838. by Pa. Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women (2nd : 1838 : Philadelphia

Cover of: Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women | Pa. Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women (2nd : 1838 : Philadelphia

Published by Cornell University Library .

Written in English

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  • History / United States / General

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The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages24
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL11897978M
ISBN 10142975074X
ISBN 109781429750745

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Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women: held in the city of New-York, May 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th, [of American Women (1st: New York, N.Y.) Anti-Slavery Convention] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women: held in the city of New-York, May 9th, 10th, 11thPrice: $ Book/Printed Material Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, held in Philadelphia.

May 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th, May 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th, National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection copy. Anti-Slavery Convention Of American Women Philadelphia, Pa.), Lucy Stone, and National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection.

Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, held in Philadelphia. May 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th. Philadelphia: Printed by Merrihew and Gunn, Pdf. The first Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women was held on May 9, [1] One hundred and seventy-five women, from ten different states and representing twenty female antislavery groups, gathered in New York City to discuss their role in the American abolition movement.

Proceedings of the third Anti-slavery Convention of American Women, held in Philadelphia, May 1st, 2d and 3d, Item PreviewPages: The first Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women was held on May 9–12, One hundred and seventy-five women, from ten different states and representing twenty female antislavery groups, gathered in New York City to discuss their role in the American abolition movement.

Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, held in Philadelphia. May 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th, This pamphlet helps to emphasize the relationship between abolitionism and women. Full text of "Proceedings of the third Anti-slavery Convention of American Women, held in Philadelphia, May 1st, 2d and 3d, " See other formats E A ^H 1 n ^^^^^H^BdbbU ^^^ i LIBRARY OF CONGRESS D0DD17HSllb f Sj.

'b V". ^^-'s^. Find out more: You can read the Proceedings of the General Anti-Slavery Convention, published inon the Internet more background on the British antislavery movement, see Howard Temperley, British Antislavery (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, ); Seymour Drescher, Abolition: A History of Slavery and Antislavery (New York: Cambridge University.

The American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS; –) was an abolitionist society founded by William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan. Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave, was a key leader of this society who often spoke at its meetings.

William Wells Brown was also a freed slave who often spoke at meetings. Bythe society had 1, local chapters with aroundmembers. The Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, Sarah Forten, Letter to Angelina Grimké, Philadelphia, Ap Angelina Grimké, An Appeal to the Women of the Nominally Free States, The Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, Proceedings, New York City, May 9–12, Image 2 of National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection copy MINUTES.

Proceeding of an Anti-Slavery Convention of Women, assembled from various parts of the United States, in Pennsylvania Hall, in the city of Philadelphia, on Tuesday, the 15th of May, Proceedings of the third Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women: held in Philadelphia, May 1st, 2d and 3d, [Pa.) Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women (3rd: Philadelphia] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This volume is produced from digital images from the Cornell University Library Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection. Proceedings of the Anti-slavery convention of American women, held in Philadelphia. May 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th, by Anti-slavery convention of American women (2d: Philadelphia, Pa.); National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection (Library of Congress) DLC; Stone, Lucy,former owner.

The World Anti-Slavery Convention met for the first time at Exeter Hall in London, on 12–23 June It was organized by the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, largely on the initiative of the English Quaker Joseph Sturge. The exclusion of women from the convention gave a great impetus to the women's suffrage movement in the United States.

Women's innovative organizational efforts can be followed in reports of the Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women (Philadelphia: EA/EA/ EA), an early attempt at interracial cooperation. Get this from a library.

Proceedings of the Anti-slavery Convention of American Women: held in the city of New-York, May 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th, [Mary S Parker; William S Dorr;].

Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women: held in Philadelphia, May 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th, by Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women (2nd: Philadelphia, Pa.).

At 10 o'clock, A. the Convention was called to order. On the nomination of a committee, appointed at preliminary meeting, on Monday, May 14th, the Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women.

Anti-slavery Convention of American Women (2nd: Philadelphia, Pa.). Proceedings of the Anti-slavery convention of American women, held in Philadelphia. May 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th, Philadelphia, Printed by Merrihew and Gunn, (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book.

Proceedings of the Anti-slavery Convention of American Women held in the city of New-York, May 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th, Publisher: New York: Printed by W.S. Dorr, Anti-slavery Convention of American Women (3rd: Philadelphia, Pa.). Proceedings of the third Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women.

Philadelphia: Printed by Merrihew and Thompson, (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: OCLC Number: Description. Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American WomenPamphlet By: AnonymousDate: May Source: Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, Held in Philadelphia, May 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th, Philadelphia, PA: Merrihew & Gunn, About the Author: The Anti-slavery Convention of American Women was organized by Lucretia Mott and other women.

An excerpt from an printed pamphlet, Proceedings of the Anti-slavery Convention of American Women. The text of Frederick Douglass’s speech, “What, to the slave, is the Fourth of July?”. Get this from a library. Proceedings of the Anti-slavery Convention of American Women: held in Philadelphia.

May 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th, [Mary S Parker;] -- This pamphlet helps to emphasize the relationship between abolitionism and women's rights. "the extinction of slavery and the slave-trade will be attained most effectually by the employment of those means which are of a moral, religious, and pacific character": first edition, presentation copy, of proceedings of the general anti-slavery convention,presented by the british and foreign anti-slavery society (slavery).

Antislavery, Opposition to slavery in British North America began in the late seventeenth century but was limited mostly to a minority of Quakers and a few Purita Slavery, Slavery Slavery is the unconditional servitude of one individual to another.

A slave is usually acquired by purchase and legally described as chattel Thomas Clarkson, Clarkson, Thomas (–). Combining documents with an interpretive essay, this book is the first to offer a much-needed guide to the emergence of the women's rights movement within the anti-slavery activism of the s.

A   Report of a Delegate to the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women: Held in Philadelphia, May Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Ohio Anti-slavery Convention (). Report on the condition of the people of color in the state of Ohio: From the Proceedings of the Ohio Anti-slavery Convention, held at Putnam, on the 22d, 23d, and 24th of April, Published by Isaac Knapp.

Boston Female Anti-slavery Society (). The women came from ten different states and represented twenty abolitionist groups. Among them were many women who would later be active in the suffrage movement, including including Lucretia Mott; the Grimké Sisters, Angelina and Sarah; and Lydia Maria Child.

Notable among the delegates were five African-American women, including the abolitionist Julia Williams, who had been. Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, Proceedings, New York City, MayAn unprecedented event with an unprecedented resolution.

Catharine E. Beecher, Essay on Slavery and Abolitionism, with Reference to the Duty of American Females, The first printed opposition comes from a woman. An Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women ( - ) The first Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women was held on May 9, Approximately women gathered in New York City to discuss their role in the American abolition movement.

Mary S. Parker was the President of. When women from nine northern states came together years ago "to constitute the first Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women," as Dorothy Sterling writes, "they were uncomfortably conscious of violating a powerful taboo." The meeting was "not only the first public politcal meeting of U.S.

s: 1. Offering a much-needed guide to the emergence of the women's rights movement within the anti-slavery activism beginning in the 's, Women's Rights Emerges Within the Anti-Slavery Movement, uses a rich collection of over 50 documents to provide access to the world of abolitionists and women's right advocates and their passionate struggles for emancipation.

General Anti-slavery Convention. & British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society. Proceedings of the General Anti-slavery Convention called by the committee of the British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society, and held in London, from Friday, June 12th, to Tuesday, June 23rd, London: British and Foreign Anti-slavery Society.

MLA Citation. Yee, Shirley J. (), Black Women Abolitionists: A Study in Activism, –, University of Tennessee Press, ISBNarchived from the original on Febru ; Proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women: Held in Philadelphia May 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th, Merrihew and Gunn.

Having endeavored to represent your body in the anti-slavery Convention of American Women, held in Philadelphia,l will now at tempt to represent that Convention to you; or, rather, I would so vividly and faithfully describe its proceedings, and the various interesting events with which it' was connected, as to take you individually to the scene Author: Laura H.

Lovell. Proceedings of seventh annual meeting (Excerpts) Citation Information: American Anti-Slavery Society, Proceedings of seventh annual meeting. (Excerpts), New York, Anti-Slavery collection: 18thth century. From the Library of Society of Friends. Yale University.

Microform. Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Meeting of the American Anti-Slavery Society, Held, for the. Included in the collection are records of the Providence (R.I.) Anti-Slavery Society, ; the proceedings of the Anti-slavery Convention of American Women in Philadelphia in ; the eighth annual report of the Boston Female Anti-slavery Society from ; Jonathan Edwards's sermon "The Injustice and Impolicy of the Slave Trade and.

Appendix. To the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women: Dear Sisters: With the deepest emotions of gratitude to our Almighty Father, we congratulate you upon your assemblage, for the second time, as a we rejoice in the wisdom and love that we trust will overshadow you in your deliberations, we cannot but contemplate with awe the sublime results that may emanate from your.Sixth Annual Report of the American Free Produce Association.

Phil.: Merrihew and Thompson, Proceedings of the Anti-slavery convention of American women, held in Philadelphia. May 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th, Anti-slavery convention of American women. Philadelphia, 2d. Philadelphia: Merrihew and Gunn, The growing tensions over race and gender exploded into violence in Maywhen the second Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women held their second national meeting in Philadelphia’s Pennsylvania Hall.

On May 17th, a huge mob of pro-slavery protestors, enraged by the presence of white women publicly interacting with both men and African.

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