Rational addictive behavior and cigarette smoking by Frank J. Chaloupka

Cover of: Rational addictive behavior and cigarette smoking | Frank J. Chaloupka

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Compulsive behavior -- Economic aspects -- Mathematical models.,
  • Nicotine addiction -- Economic aspects -- Mathematical models.,
  • Cigarettes -- Prices -- Econometric models.,
  • Demand functions (Economic theory),
  • Consumption (Economics) -- United States.

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementFrank J. Chaloupka.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper no. 3268, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 3268.
The Physical Object
Pagination47 p. ;
Number of Pages47
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22437035M

Download Rational addictive behavior and cigarette smoking

After a discussion of cigarette smoking in the context of the Becker-Murphy () model of rational addictive behavior, demand equations are derived accounting for the tolerance, reinforcement, and withdrawal characteristic of addictive consumption. These are contrasted to Cited by: Cigarette demand equations accounting for tolerance, reinforcement, and withdrawal are derived using the Becker-Murphy model of rational addiction and are estimated using data from the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Estimates imply that smoking is addictive, individuals are not myopic, and price increases would reduce by: Get this from a library. Rational addictive behavior and cigarette smoking. [Frank J Chaloupka; National Bureau of Economic Research.].

Abstract: Cigarette demand equations accounting for tolerance, reinforcement, and withdrawal are derived using the Becker-Murphy model of rational addiction and are estimated using data from the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Estimates imply that smoking is addictive, individuals are not myopic, and price increases Cited by: Downloadable.

After a discussion of cigarette smoking in the context of the Becker-Murphy () model of rational addictive behavior, demand equations are derived accounting for the tolerance, reinforcement, and withdrawal characteristic of addictive consumption. These are contrasted to equations developed under the competing hypotheses that smoking is not addictive or that cigarettes.

Downloadable. Author(s): Frank J. Chaloupka. Abstract: After a discussion of cigarette smoking in the context of the Becker-Murphy () model of rational addictive behavior, demand equations are derived accounting for the tolerance, reinforcement, and withdrawal characteristic of addictive consumption.

These are contrasted to equations developed under the competing hypotheses that. Downloadable (with restrictions). Cigarette demand equations accounting for tolerance, reinforcement, and withdrawal are derived using the Becker-Murphy model of rational addiction and are estimated using data from the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Estimates imply that smoking is addictive, individuals are not myopic, and price increases would reduce demand. The Theory of Rational Addictions, by Gary Becker & Kevin Murphy (), was a rational choice model that became a standard tool for economists modeling addictive approach differs from other theories of addiction by modeling addictive behavior as the gradual implementation of a rational, forward‐looking plan, where consumption at any point in time is partly.

It is well known that cigarette smoking and the use of other addictive goods is harmful to health. Book. Full-text available consider addiction as a fully rational behavior, assuming that.

Chaloupka FJ. Rational Addictive Behavior and Cigarette Smoking. The Journal of Political Economy. ; – doi: / Baltagi BH, Griffin JM. The Econometrics of Rational Addiction: The Case of Cigarettes.

Journal of Business & Economic Statistics. ; – Arellano M, Bond S. Four theories are presented to account for addiction, defined as a high rate of consumption of a substance that is ultimately harmful to the organism. The theories are teleological and behavioral in the sense that the ultimate motivational forces they posit lie in the environmental context of behavior—in an economic utility function or a process of behavioral adjustment—rather than in an.

The study here adds empirical evidence to myopic addiction models of cigarette demand and also provides a sensitivity analysis by estimating a model of rational addiction with the same data.

Note that dynamic models with addictive behavior predict long-run demand price elasticities will be larger than short-run elasticities (in absolute value).

1. Introduction. Conventional cigarette use (“smoking”) is responsible for approximately one in five US deaths each year, with a disproportionate burden of disease among those with mental illness (Prochaska et al., ).Excluding individuals with substance use disorders, smoking rates for adults with any past-year mental illness were 33% in –, as compared to 21% among others.

smoking status) data from to (BRFSS). The results show that, a) smoking consumption is a rational addictive behavior and that, b) as prices decrease, consumption increases significantly, but smoking participation does not change much. The results verify that cigarette consumption follows rational addictive behavior.

Empirical Work. The theory of rational addictive behavior has important implications concerning the impact of a smoker’s socioeconomic status on his or her incentive to quit. The research reported on here extends the previously developed theory of addictive behavior to show its implications for both successful and unsuccessful quitting.

This framework models addictive behavior as being perfectly rational. Consumers anticipate the addiction and health consequences of their decisions and choose to adopt addictive behavior because the anticipated benefits from this consumption, in terms of smoking pleasure, peer acceptance, etc., out-weigh all of these costs.

Data. Data on cigarette prices and consumption were obtained from The Tax Burden on Tobacco,12 a standard source for these data. Also, during the period spanning the mid-to-late s, the Tobacco Use Supplement (TUS) of the US Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey collected data on individuals’ attitudes toward smoking policies (and thus the extent to which smoking is socially.

Today: Yesterday: This Week: Last Week: THE TRADITIONAL VIEW OF economists is that cigarette taxes are highly regressive.1– 4 A regressive tax is one for which the poor pay a higher percentage of their income in taxes than do the rich5—a tax that hits the poor more than the rich.

The regressivity of cigarette taxes has not been considered very important, because it is the overall progressivity of the tax system that matters, and.

1. Introduction. Since the introduction of Becker and Murphy ()'s rational addiction theory, the consumption behaviors of addictive products, such as cigarettes, have received considerable attention from economists.

To test the validity of the theory, numerous empirical studies have been conducted, such as Chaloupka () and Becker et al. Downloadable. Cigarette demand equations, derived from the Becker-Murphy model of rational addictive behavior, are estimated separately for men and women.

These demand equations account for the reinforcement, tolerance, and withdrawal factors characterizing addictive consumption. Results obtained from these demand equations support the hypothesis that cigarette smoking is an addictive behavior.

addiction to derive and estimate cigarette demand equations that ex-plicitly account for the addictive nature of cigarette smoking.

Cigarette smoking is ideal for empirically testing the rational addic-tion model. Cigarettes, because of nicotine, are addictive, with smok-ing the most widespread addictive behavior in today's society. The. smoking. Cigarette smoking is ideal for empirically testing the rational addiction model.

Cigarettes, due to the nicotine contained in them, are an addictive good, with cigarette smoking the most widespread addictive behavior in today's society.5 Due to the high incidence of cigarette smoking. Get this from a library. Rational Addictive Behavior and Cigarette Smoking.

[Frank J Chaloupka; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Abstract: After a discussion of cigarette smoking in the context of the Becker- Abstract: Murphy () model of rational addictive behavior, demand equations are. Abstract: derived accounting. Rational addictive behavior and cigarette smoking.

Home; Rational addictive behavior and cigarette smoking; The potential for using excise taxes to reduce smoking J The effects of excise taxes and regulations on cigarette smoking July. Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) for Addiction rewarding oneself for refusing a cigarette, penalizing oneself for smoking, removing ashtrays in the.

Downloadable. The hypotheses of non-addiction, myopia and rational addiction are tested using annual, quarterly and monthly data. Changes in the prices of Japanese cigarettes can be viewed as exogenous from the point of view of consumer behavior, because the Japanese government controls cigarette prices.

The empirical results of this paper support the addiction hypothesis. Introduction. Tobacco smoking is associated with increased risk of a wide variety of health problems—certainly the best known being lung cancer and cardiovascular disease(s), but ongoing research now suggests that it affects nearly every organ in the body [].Many public health interventions have been attempted in efforts to decrease the population prevalence of cigarette smoking.

Rational Addictive Behavior and Cigarette Smoking. Rational addiction and smoking cessation: an empirical study. Journal of Socio-Economics 28 (5), –]. While a smoker's rationality plays a critical role in his decision to quit, whether the.

The rational addiction approach claims to draw support from empirical studies of smoking behavior. These studies all use the number of cigarettes per capita as the explanatory variable without taking account of the nicotine content of the cigarettes.

Regulatory Policy When Behavior is Addictive: Smoking, Cigarette Taxes and Bootlegging Michael J. Licari and Kenneth J. Meier Political Research Quarterly 1, AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF CIGARETTE ADDICTION AZ S TRACT We use a framework suggested by a model of rational addiction to analyze empirically the demand for cigarettes.

The data consist of per capita cigarettes sales (in packs) annually by state for the period through The empirical results provide support for the implications of a. Unhealthy habits, such as smoking cigarettes or eating a poor diet, can have lifetime effects that threatens people with serious health problems as they grow older.

It is hard to alter routines especially the ones you are used to do. This is true, especially in the case of physical and mentally addictive practice such as tobacco use. There elements of addictive behavior: reinforcement, tolerance and withdrawal.

Different models of addiction (rational addiction, melioration theory and hyperbolic discounting) based on different assumptions and with different implications. Empirical research can find support to theoretical models. Suggested movie for tonight: Trainspotting ().

A consumer who begins smoking reveals a preference for cigarettes strong en ough to offset the negative impact addiction has on future utility. For a consumer with a positive cost to addiction ([[lambda].sub.t] [less than] 0), consumption of the addictive and harmful good is reduced as compared to the non-addictive good.

The main insights of rational addictive behavior are theoretically derived by Becker and Murphy (). Hand books of health eco nomics. Rational Addictive Behavior and Cigarette Smoking. The decision to engage in a harmful addictive behavior, such as smoking, seemingly presents a problem for standard economic models.

For a forward-looking utility-maximizing agent, consuming a harmful addictive substance would be an irrational act. The Rational Addiction (RA) model of Becker and Murphy () shows that consumption of an addictive.

This insight has led to the central empirical test of the rational addiction model: asking whether consumption today is dependent on consumption tomorrow.

The first paper to carry out this test was Becker, Grossman, and Murphy [4], focusing on cigarette smoking as an addictive behavior. They compile a dataset of cigarette consumption and.

Abstract. Governments have long taxed cigarettes and other tobacco products. Tobacco taxes have been thought to satisfy the Ramsey Rule that states that consumption taxes should be applied to goods with relatively inelastic demands so that welfare losses associated with taxation will be minimized.

cigarettes may be levied aiming at signaling to smokers those costs of smoking which they have not recognized correctly. A cigarette tax could reduce consumption to the levels consumed under complete information.

Addictive Behavior Addictive behavior may prevent consumers from making rational .Economic theory. Though controversial, this theoretical approach has become "one of the standard models in the literature on addictive behavior" in economics, and a variety of extensions and modifications have been developed and published by other authors over the years.

A survey of researchers who had authored or co-authored peer-reviewed articles on rational addiction theory. Cigarette smoking is one of the most powerful addictions known. Since its large-scale industrial production early in this century, the popularity of cigarettes is spreading like wildfire.

It is seen in so many movies today. An actor lights up a cigarette on screen going about their lives. Usually certain people wouldn't stop to think twice about it because it has become something we are used.

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